Essay example – Optimal J http://optimalj.com/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 17:18:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://optimalj.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-24T001514.613-150x150.png Essay example – Optimal J http://optimalj.com/ 32 32 ‘A recipe for hate’: why Boris Johnson may have finally gone too far https://optimalj.com/a-recipe-for-hate-why-boris-johnson-may-have-finally-gone-too-far/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 17:18:14 +0000 https://optimalj.com/a-recipe-for-hate-why-boris-johnson-may-have-finally-gone-too-far/ Boris Johnson, long famous for brushing aside accusations of misrepresentation, deception or outright lying which, far from slowing his rise, seemed only to bolster his image as an incorrigible thug, suddenly faces potential political death for the the very charge to which he had seemed immune. Even his critics seem surprised at how quickly the […]]]>

Boris Johnson, long famous for brushing aside accusations of misrepresentation, deception or outright lying which, far from slowing his rise, seemed only to bolster his image as an incorrigible thug, suddenly faces potential political death for the the very charge to which he had seemed immune.

Even his critics seem surprised at how quickly the public and politicians have turned on Mr Johnson, Britain’s Prime Minister, over accusations he lied about attending parties at his official residence in May 2020 who violated his own government’s lockdown orders.

But while some of his past lies may have been more harmful to others around him, this one hits on a particular sensibility that psychologists say holds a special power to infuriate.

Moral hypocrisy — behaving badly while simultaneously harassing the rest of us for doing good — evokes a level of anger that neither lying nor wrongdoing brings about on its own, studies show repeatedly. .

Mr Johnson’s true sin, in this account, drove Britons to self-private for the common good, as his office staged events that violated this shared spirit of sacrifice and, risking viral spread, undermined its effects.

He acknowledged this, telling Parliament earlier this month: ‘I know the rage they feel towards me and the government I lead when they think that in Downing Street itself the rules are not properly followed by the people who make the rules.”

As if to underscore the backlash such transgressions can bring, tennis star Novak Djokovic is simultaneously facing, after his own long history of controversies that never quite caught up with him, serious professional damage as a result of charges he fabricated or obscured in his waiver request. to Australia’s Covid vaccination requirement.

The incident has become a flashpoint in global debates over vaccine rules. But it also inspired fierce anger perhaps in part because, like Mr Johnson, Mr Djokovic was looking to benefit from society’s adherence to those rules, which made Australia safe enough to host the tournament in which he had to play. And he did it by bending or breaking those same rules to satisfy his own desires to avoid the vaccine and travel freely.

“Hypocrites use a double layer of deception,” neuroscientist Erman Misirlisoy wrote in an essay on the special power of this behavior to anger people.

The first layer: encouraging others around them to follow rules that will benefit them, even if only implicitly by signaling their support for those rules. For example, Mr. Johnson has imposed lockdowns that will improve his own security and political standing. Or Mr Djokovic telling Australian officials (and, on social media, his fans) that he is following the country’s Covid rules so he can play in his tennis tournament.

The second layer – lying about their own compliance – is so offensive because it amounts to undermining the very collective effort they demanded of others.

Writer Hannah Arendt, reflecting on society’s distaste for hypocrisy, called him “the vice of vices”. While terrible crimes might “confront us with the perplexity of radical evil,” she wrote, “only the hypocrite is truly rotten to the core.”

As Dr. Misirlisoy wrote, “It’s a recipe for hate when you get caught.”

But why?

“When you stop to think about it, it’s actually a psychological headache,” said Jillian Jordan, a psychologist at Yale University who studies this behavior. said. Everyone occasionally breaks social norms or rules that they otherwise uphold.

And hypocrisy is not uncommon among public figures. Athletes project regular public images while living amidst the splendor of yachts and helicopters. Mr Djokovic emphasized new age solidarity while appearing alongside Serbian ultranationalists.

Dishonesty, by itself, is also not generally very surprising. Mr Johnson mocked his own reputation, saying during an event in 2018, “My strategy is to smear my career with so many luring mistakes, no one knows which one to attack.”

But, acknowledging that there is something different about people caught pressuring others to live up to standards they despise, Mr Johnson told a reporter the same week that his whole political journey had begun by meeting left-leaning elitist students at university and feeling a “sense of outrage at their glutinous hypocrisy.

The reason, according to some psychologists, is that moral hypocrisy represents, in some way, an attack on the social contract itself.

Since our origin as a species, societies have operated on an implicit pact: each of us is better off if we all contribute to the common good, even if it means giving up certain things.

It only works if everyone trusts that everyone will follow. If that breaks down, so does each individual’s incentive to serve the common good.

In the nomadic tribes where our communal instincts evolved over hundreds of thousands of years, it was a matter of life and death. Without trusting cooperation, the group would perish.

(The pandemic has returned these life-or-death stakes, not to mention the imperative of individual sacrifice for the well-being of the community, in the form of masks, vaccines and social distancing, which perhaps explains why sensitivity to moral hypocrisy suddenly seems so acute And Britain’s cultural emphasis on fair play, rule-abiding and sacrifice may further heighten these sensitivities.)

Moral hypocrites turn this spirit of shared obligation against the very group it is meant to serve. They are hoarding the fruits of collective sacrifice for themselves – Mr. Johnson enjoying a party during the lockdown, Mr. Djokovic tossing himself between societies secured for him by grueling restrictions – and in a way that undermines the benefits for everybody.

And, when their hypocrisy is exposed, it sends a dangerous signal: you, too, can enjoy the benefits of everyone else’s work while pretending to follow. For the rest of the group, condemning the hypocrite in the strongest possible terms is an act of self-defense, a way to deter others from trying to do the same.

This may be the reason why Dr. Jordan discovered in a series of studies, people will condemn an ​​act of moral hypocrisy far more vehemently than any other kind of transgression tested by his team.

The primary offense of moral hypocrisy, and the outrage it provokes, are well described in a Photo which has, all this month, accompanied Mr Johnson’s parties’ social media reporting and discussions.

It shows Queen Elizabeth II at a funeral ceremony for her husband Prince Philip, sitting masked and alone on an otherwise empty pew, dutifully obeying the lockdown rules that Mr Johnson’s staff had breached with a party he turned out only the day before .

Mr Johnson’s parties, of course, did little to cause the pandemic which has forced the Queen to practice socially distanced mourning. But the implied affront to his sacrifice, and the national sacrifice he represented, was too much for some Britons.

“I can only renew my apologies,” Mr Johnson said, in a highly unusual show of contrition towards the monarch, “both to her majesty and to the country”.

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The Illinois Municipal Utilities Association is accepting scholarship applications https://optimalj.com/the-illinois-municipal-utilities-association-is-accepting-scholarship-applications/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 01:24:59 +0000 https://optimalj.com/the-illinois-municipal-utilities-association-is-accepting-scholarship-applications/ The Illinois Municipal Utilities Association is offering four $1,000 scholarships to eligible high school students. To be eligible, applicants must be high school students whose parents or legal guardians are residential customers of local member utilities. Eligible students must submit an application and an essay of 500 words or less answering one of four usefulness-related […]]]>

The Illinois Municipal Utilities Association is offering four $1,000 scholarships to eligible high school students.

To be eligible, applicants must be high school students whose parents or legal guardians are residential customers of local member utilities.

Eligible students must submit an application and an essay of 500 words or less answering one of four usefulness-related questions.

Applications and essays are due March 11, 2022.

The application, list of essay questions and eligibility requirements can be downloaded at www.imea.org/IMUA_Scholarship.aspx.

The scholarship program aims to promote and recognize academic achievement, as well as increase young adults’ awareness of the many issues facing consumers and public-power municipalities. For more information, contact DeeDee Bunch at IMUA at (217) 789-4632 or dbunch@imea.org.

Each spring, high school seniors whose families reside (or use utilities) in an IMUA municipality are eligible to enter an essay contest. Each winner receives a $1,000 prize from IMUA to be used for tuition.

The 2021 winners are: Riley Trendler, St. Charles; Vedanth Ganesh, Naperville; Kassandra Estrella Rock Falls; and Lily Conkle, Metropolis.

The list of member municipalities includes: Albany, Altamont, Anna, Batavia, Bethany, Breese, Bushnell, Cairo, Carlyle, Carmi, Casey, Chatham, Cobden, Edinburg, Fairfield, Farmer City, Flora, Freeburg, Geneseo, Geneva, Greenup, Highland, IMEA, IPEA, Jonesboro, Karnak, Ladd, Marshall, Martinsville, Mascoutah, McLeansboro, Metropolis, Naperville, Oglesby, Peru, Pinckneyville, Princeton, Rantoul, Red Bud, Riverton, Rochelle, Rock Falls, Roodhouse, Springfield, St. Charles, Sullivan, Toledo, Waterloo, Wayne City, Winchester and Winnetka.

Essays must be on your choice of one of the following four problems/questions:

• Net Metering — (Electricity): Net metering is an electricity billing concept that is rapidly gaining popularity and acceptance by electricity consumers, especially solar energy enthusiasts. What do you see as the advantages and/or disadvantages of net metering for electric service providers, including municipally owned and operated utilities? How does net metering benefit landlords? Are there any downsides for landlords? For utilities? (Please explain and use specific examples to support your argument).

• Electric vehicles: Electric vehicles can be fun to drive and offer a number of advantages over gasoline-powered vehicles, including better economy, better efficiency, lower carbon emissions and less maintenance. What do you suggest as possible solutions to address some of the disadvantages cited with electric vehicles, which include a higher purchase price compared to standard vehicles as well as safety and battery issues?

• Water: Aquifers provide a stable source of drinking water for many communities across the country. As aquifers recharge and/or replenish naturally, some of these sources become insufficient to meet the needs of growing communities, especially those located in areas of high water demand. In addition to the demand for drinking water, other users pump groundwater from aquifers for industrial or agricultural purposes, which puts additional pressure on the aquifers themselves. Do you think the current regulations in place in Illinois are enough to stop aquifer depletion? please explain

and describe if there are any additional regulations or actions that you believe should be taken to protect aquifers as a stable source of drinking water for communities in Illinois.

• Public Energy (Benefits of Public Energy): Public energy has many distinct characteristics that directly and indirectly benefit consumers and contribute to community progress and economic development. What are some of these many benefits and how do you see them contributing to improving your community, including its quality of life? Please explain.

]]> House panel votes 6-4 to restrict racism lessons in Arizona schools | Local News https://optimalj.com/house-panel-votes-6-4-to-restrict-racism-lessons-in-arizona-schools-local-news/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 01:33:06 +0000 https://optimalj.com/house-panel-votes-6-4-to-restrict-racism-lessons-in-arizona-schools-local-news/ Representative Jennifer Pawlik, D-Chandler, who is an elementary school teacher, said she was worried about what would happen if a history lesson made a student feel uncomfortable. “It was not my intention,” she said. “But if someone has the feeling, ‘Oh my God, I didn’t know this was happening’, it makes a first grader sad, […]]]>

Representative Jennifer Pawlik, D-Chandler, who is an elementary school teacher, said she was worried about what would happen if a history lesson made a student feel uncomfortable.

“It was not my intention,” she said. “But if someone has the feeling, ‘Oh my God, I didn’t know this was happening’, it makes a first grader sad, will the teacher lose their teaching? degrees, school Will she be fined?’

Udall, however, said it comes down to intent.

“If you read it carefully, it says that a teacher should not only teach an individual should feeling discomfort, experiencing anguish or some other form of psychological distress because of the individual’s race, ethnicity or gender,” she said.

Specifically, Udall said, teachers should teach that students are responsible for their own actions, “not what happened in history.”

Rep. Reginald Bolding, D-Laveen, said it wasn’t that simple.

For example, he said, there could be a discussion of the Fair Housing Act, the 1968 federal law designed to prevent discrimination in people’s ability to buy and rent houses and apartments, something which can be taught as a matter of history. But Bolding said the lessons go beyond those simple facts.

“A student might ask, ‘Why?’ or how?’ ” he said. ‘And that’s when you start having a deeper discussion about ‘why did you need the Fair Housing Act of 1968’.”

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Pariksha Pe Charcha Certificate: Do you want to get this certificate? Know about registration, essay topics and other details https://optimalj.com/pariksha-pe-charcha-certificate-do-you-want-to-get-this-certificate-know-about-registration-essay-topics-and-other-details/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 07:23:30 +0000 https://optimalj.com/pariksha-pe-charcha-certificate-do-you-want-to-get-this-certificate-know-about-registration-essay-topics-and-other-details/ Pariksha Pe Charcha Certificate: The last date to register for ‘Pariksha Pe Charcha’, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s interaction with students, parents and teachers, is January 20, 2022. Those interested should note that they can participate by s’ registering on MyGovIndia official website at innovateindia.mygov.in/ppc-2022. Watch the Zee Business live stream below: “Worried about stealing dreams […]]]>

Pariksha Pe Charcha Certificate: The last date to register for ‘Pariksha Pe Charcha’, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s interaction with students, parents and teachers, is January 20, 2022. Those interested should note that they can participate by s’ registering on MyGovIndia official website at innovateindia.mygov.in/ppc-2022.

Watch the Zee Business live stream below:

“Worried about stealing dreams or worrying about the future? The solution of each question will be found in the Pariksha Pe Charcha 2022 dialogue with PM @narendramodi. So children sign up immediately: https://innovateindia.mygov.in/ppc-2022/ #PPC2022,” MyGovIndia recently tweeted from its official Twitter account.

Interested students should note that each winner will receive a specially designed Certificate of Appreciation.

Students should know some guidelines before enrolling in ‘Pariksha Pe Charcha’. They are the following:

1) Participation is open to students in classes 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th only.

2) One can participate in the contest by first registering on the MyGov platform. For participants from outside India, registration can be done using OTP sent via email.

3) Students can only participate in one theme specified for them.

4) Students must not exceed the word limit mentioned for each activity.

5) Students must submit original, creative and simple answers.

6) The question to the Prime Minister must not exceed 500 characters.

7) Upon successful submission of applications, all students will receive a digital certificate of participation which they can download and share on social media with #PPC2022.

8) Each winner will receive a Certificate of Appreciation from the Director, NCERT.

9) Each winner will also receive a special Pariksha Pe Charcha kit including an Exam Warriors book in Hindi and English, written by the Prime Minister.

Topics students can write about include:

1) Review stress management strategies during COVID-19: Creative strategies you have adopted as a student to deal with pandemic stress and the stress of upcoming exams.

2) Azadi Ka Amrit Mahostav: Do you know the history of the village/town/city where you live? Write about your village, town or city and share an unknown facet of the freedom struggle there.

3) Autonomous School for an Autonomous India: What does autonomy mean to you? Share your ideas for making you and your teachers “Aatmanirbhar” in terms of teaching and learning when schools are not fully functional due to COVID-19.

4) Clean India, Green India: Your ideas on how to strengthen India’s fight against climate change.

5) Digital collaboration in classrooms: How your teacher made your online class fun, interesting and effective during the pandemic. Your perspective on how the quality of online courses can be improved.

6) Preservation of the environment and resilience to climate change: Activities undertaken by you as a student during the pandemic period for environmental conservation and climate change.

In case of further queries and details, interested students can log on to the official website at innovateindia.mygov.in/ppc-2022.

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Ultimate diseconomy of agglomeration: the standard of living https://optimalj.com/ultimate-diseconomy-of-agglomeration-the-standard-of-living/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 01:39:16 +0000 https://optimalj.com/ultimate-diseconomy-of-agglomeration-the-standard-of-living/ Significant new ground was broken by Justice Clark, Senior Director of Research at the Cicero Institute in his Breakthrough Institute Journal essay. In “Sprawl is Good: The Environmental Case for Suburbia,” he overturns the fundamental assumptions that underlie the battle of planning against urban sprawl (the ideological term is “urban sprawl”). Challengingly, Glock speaks of […]]]>

Significant new ground was broken by Justice Clark, Senior Director of Research at the Cicero Institute in his Breakthrough Institute Journal essay. In “Sprawl is Good: The Environmental Case for Suburbia,” he overturns the fundamental assumptions that underlie the battle of planning against urban sprawl (the ideological term is “urban sprawl”).

Challengingly, Glock speaks of the “long triumph of sprawl”, describing a “clear global and long-term preference”, while the “pandemic has only made the shift to the modern, sprawling city faster and more obvious”.

Glock suggests that “instead of fighting sprawling cars, planners and environmentalists should recognize how suburban green spaces allowed for autonomous electric vehicles in green single-family homes can provide both the affordability and durability that most Americans dream of.

Glock begins with “agglomeration effects,” often cited to justify higher densities and discourage suburbanization.

Noting that there can be negative agglomeration effects, Glock offers congestion, crime, and pollution as examples. He says that: “that these problems explain why, as technology has evolved, people try to take greater advantage of the benefits of living close to each other – the agglomeration effects – without the problems of living directly on top of each other.” This has been the historical engine of urban expansion.

Glock notes that “sprawling, car-dependent cities have grown faster than dense cities for decades and are much more affordable.” The first is explained by the second. People are moving to sprawling, car-dependent cities because they are affordable.

In a strong rebuke of the most obvious densification, Glock points out that taller buildings are more expensive: “Going from five to ten stories increases the cost of every square foot. more than 50 percent.” He explains: “These costs are the result of increasingly energy-intensive materials,” a point often made by Tony Recsei, president of Save our Suburbs in Sydney.

But there is more. Glock cites California’s inherent climate advantages, which are mitigated since its prohibitive cost of living has repelled 2.7 million net domestic migrants since 2020, as many as live in the city of Chicago. Glock states that:

“Every unbuilt home, no matter where it is, takes at least two more people away from California, effectively doubling those people’s carbon emissions. It’s hard to imagine many laws with such a deleterious climate impact, compounded because it exacerbates what attorney Jennifer Hernandez called California’s “Green Crow Jim.”

In many metropolises, agglomeration economies have been overwhelmed by diseconomies that have rippled through to the detriment of people, especially the middle class, and even worse, those with low incomes.

Ultimate diseconomy of agglomeration: a lower standard of living

Overall, agglomeration effects should be positive and people should be the beneficiaries.

In Under pressure: the middle class in a hurry the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has reported that the future of the middle class is threatened by the cost of living, which is rising much faster than incomes. In addition, the OECD reported that “housing has been the main driver of rising middle-class spending” and that the biggest increases in housing costs are in property costs rather than rents.

It has not always been the case. As late as 1970, there were slight variations in housing affordability among major metropolitan areas in the United States. Virtually every major metropolitan area in the United States was affordable – with median multiples (price-to-income ratios) of 3.0 or less. Australia, Canada and New Zealand maintained similar accessibility until the early 1990s.

This was to come to an end, with the tightening of regulations on housing and land use, and in particular with the limits of urban growth and the green belts of the urban containment policy. The planning literature indicates, for example, that the limits of urban growth not only driving up property values throughout the confined urban area, but also that they are intended to (Figure 1). Proponents ignore this effect, assuming that densities would increase, lower land costs per square foot and preserve housing affordability.

In reality, ruinous losses in housing affordability followed. Median multiples went from 3.0 or less to pre-pandemic levels 7 to 9 (2019) in San Francisco, San Jose, Honolulu, Los Angeles and San Diego and 5 or more in the Seattle, Denver and Portland markets. The median multiples exceeded eleven in Vancouver and Sydney, more than eight in Auckland, Toronto and Melbourne, and more than five in Adelaide, Perth and Brisbane. In addition, house price increases have been concentrated in land cost, with little real increase in construction costs.

These developments were in line with the analysis of the OECD, which still supported urban confinement, but warned that sufficient developable land must be available within the limits of urban growth to maintain housing affordability (in Rethinking urban sprawl: towards sustainable cities). Brookings Institution Economist Anthony Downs warned that the preservation of a competitive land market was necessary to maintain housing affordability.

It is difficult to imagine the effect of agglomeration more destructive than the fall in the standard of living. Yet that is what the loss of housing affordability does. The material standard of living of average incomes is lowered by an excessively prohibitive cost of living. Low-income households are further disadvantaged, with many losing their independence, cosigned to subsidized housing and other social assistance programs.

The standard of living high enough to save

Modern affluence is perhaps humanity’s crowning achievement over the past two centuries, with the rise of a large, well-to-do middle class. This has been most evident in the US, Canada and Australia, as well as the UK, Japan, Europe, South Korea and has spread to China and beyond. This is an advance that should not be sacrificed.

Rightly, Glock concludes, “environmentalists should embrace the same future that most Americans have already chosen.”


Wendell Cox is director of Demography, an international public policy firm located in the St. Louis metropolitan area. He is a founding principal investigator at Urban Reform Institute, Houston, Principal Investigator at Frontier Center for Public Policy in Winnipeg and a member of the advisory board of the Chapman University Center for Demography and Policy in Orange, California. He was a visiting professor at National Conservatory of Arts and Crafts in Paris. His main interests are economics, the fight against poverty, demography, urban policy and transport. He is co-author of the annual review Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey and author of Demography World Urban Areas.

Mayor Tom Bradley appointed him to three terms on the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission (1977-1985) and Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich appointed him to the Amtrak Reform Board, completing the term unexpired of New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman (1999-2002). He is author of War on Dreams: How Anti-Spread Politics Threatens Quality of Life and Towards more prosperous cities: a scoping essay on urban areas, transport, planning and dimensions of sustainability.

Photo: La Citta Vita, via Flickrbelow CC 2.0 license.

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Sight Magazine – Essay: How Colonial-Era Laws Are Used to End Independent Journalism in Hong Kong https://optimalj.com/sight-magazine-essay-how-colonial-era-laws-are-used-to-end-independent-journalism-in-hong-kong/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 00:15:19 +0000 https://optimalj.com/sight-magazine-essay-how-colonial-era-laws-are-used-to-end-independent-journalism-in-hong-kong/ January 12, 2022 YAN-HO LAI and YUEN CHAN Hong Kong was never a democracy, but it was home to a vibrant media scene and benefited from the free flow of information. No more. The National Security Law, unilaterally imposed by Beijing in 2020, clamped down on protests and effectively banned dissent. This law chilled freedom […]]]>

Hong Kong was never a democracy, but it was home to a vibrant media scene and benefited from the free flow of information. No more. The National Security Law, unilaterally imposed by Beijing in 2020, clamped down on protests and effectively banned dissent.

This law chilled freedom of expression and forced the closure of the city’s only pro-democracy newspaper, Apple Daily, in June 2021. Then, three days before the end of 2021, the city’s largest independent online media, Stand News, came to a sudden end too.

A police officer recovers box of evidence after a search of the Stand News office, after six people were arrested “for conspiring to publish a seditious publication” according to the National Security Department of the Hong Kong Police, in Hong Kong, China, December 29, 2021. PHOTO: Reuters / Tyrone Siu.

The local national security police arrested seven former directors, columnists and editors of the media, which had never hidden its pro-democracy views, for allegedly “conspiring to publish a seditious publication”. The company’s equipment was seized and its financial assets frozen. The current and former editor have been charged with criminal charges, and the outlet has shut down its website and social media accounts and deleted all online content.

Among increasing self-censorship, independent digital media like Stand News have provided space for more critical reporting and opinions. News from the stand regularly provided deep coverage of issues and individuals who have been overlooked or ignored in the mainstream media. The platform was funded primarily through monthly donations and crowdfunding.

“In a context of growing self-censorship, independent digital media like Stand News have offered space for more critical reporting and opinion. Stand News regularly provided in-depth coverage of issues and individuals who have been overlooked or ignored in the mainstream media. The platform was funded primarily through monthly donations and crowdfunding. “

A little after Apple Daily firm, Stand News had taken preventive action in response to what was it called “The arrival of the literary inquisition” in Hong Kong. The outlet announced the resignation of all but two of its directors, removed opinion pieces from its website, and suspended new donations. But that hasn’t stopped senior police officials from continuing to accuse the media of inciting public hatred against force.

National Security Police arrested over 160 dissidents and political activists from the NSL has been implemented. Apple DailyThe founder of, Jimmy Lai, his former employees and related companies have been charged under the NSL with collusion with foreign forces.

But the high-profile arrests are only part of the picture; pressure on media outlets and journalists takes many forms. In the media, pro-Beijing voices attacked Hong Kong Journalists Association and Foreign correspondents club. The government refused to renew work visas for foreign correspondents and foreign press organs such as the the Wall Street newspaper have received threat letters representatives of the Hong Kong government.



The return of sedition laws
The government is now also using colonial laws to clamp down on free speech and press freedom. Hong Kong’s sedition laws were introduced at the turn of the 20th century and can be too broad and subjective. For example, anyone who posts or distributes content that “incites hatred or arouses disaffection against” the government or the administration of justice, or promotes enmity between different categories of people in Hong Kong, can be prosecuted.

These colonial-era laws have been unused since the 1970s, but returned in the fall of 2020 when the Hong Kong Justice Department used them to indict activists who gave public speeches against the government and trade unionists who published children’s picture books on the 2019 pro-democracy protests.

Now they are used to bill reporters for Apple Daily and Stand News. And police recently told reporters that opinion pieces are not the only ones that can be considered seditious. Media interviews with activists in exile and reports of clashes between protesters and riot police can also be considered seditious if the content is viewed by the government as “fake news” or inciting hatred towards the government. and endangering national security.

Editors and reporters are now at risk of arrest if they publish articles critical of the government, if political authorities decide they are seditious. As the sedition laws predate the NSL, this potentially includes articles published before July 2020. Once charged, journalists are likely to be denied bail and face lengthy pre-trial detention.

Before the NSL, anyone accused of committing sedition could expect to be released on bail unless the court suspected a high likelihood of reoffending or absconding. But under the NSL, this principle no longer applies. The last decision by the chief justice of the highest court in Hong Kong said that since acts of sedition are considered offenses endangering national security, the defendants will only be released on bail if they meet the strict requirements set by the NSL.

Chilling effect
The impact on the Hong Kong media was immediate. At least six other independent digital media have chosen to shut down after Stand News closed, including Hong Kong Citizens News. Its editor, a respected news industry veteran, said the move was made to protect staff in an environment where no one can tell where the red lines of sedition and civilization are. national security. Ming Pao Daily large format newspaper started put warnings on all opinion pieces, indicating that the newspaper does not intend to incite hatred, contempt or disaffection against the government or a community.

Hong Kong was once known for its independent judiciary and the rule of law. Today, its laws and courts are used by the government to crush press freedom and independent journalism. The government also raised the possibility of a fake news bill This year. Unless the courts can uphold their integrity as guardians of free speech, the city’s international reputation will be further eroded.The conversation

Yan ho lai is Hong Kong Law Fellow at the Center for Asian Law, Georgetown University, and a doctoral candidate in law, at SOAS, University of London and Yuen chan is a lecturer at the School of Arts and Social Sciences, Department of Journalism, City, University of London. This article is republished from The conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read it original article.

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a city for our dreams https://optimalj.com/a-city-for-our-dreams/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://optimalj.com/a-city-for-our-dreams/ The actions of a small number of men and women can have a dramatic impact on the development of a city. As readers contemplate a new direction for Dublin – the hottest board game of the season – it’s worth remembering some of the people who could inspire us to build something more beautiful and […]]]>

The actions of a small number of men and women can have a dramatic impact on the development of a city. As readers contemplate a new direction for Dublin – the hottest board game of the season – it’s worth remembering some of the people who could inspire us to build something more beautiful and fairer than a ordinary city. To create a modern and worthy European capital, we have to look back and forward.

The city’s modern history began on July 27, 1662, when James Butler, Duke of Ormond, returned to Ireland to take on the newly restored post of Viceroy. In Dublin 1660-1860, Maurice Craig wrote about this event: “The Renaissance, in a nutshell, had arrived in Ireland. During his 10 years of exile with Charles II, Ormond had visited the court of Louis XIV in Paris. It was there that he understood how much architecture and town planning can enhance the status of a city.

In Frank McDonald’s new book, A Little History of the Future of Dublin, the author observes that the Duke of Ormond was the first man to imagine the metropolis that Dublin could become. More than three centuries after his death, the legacy of Ormond’s tenure as viceroy is apparent at the Royal Hospital at Kilmainham; at St Stephen’s Green and Smithfield; within the grounds of Phoenix Park. Most Dubliners would pity the idea of ​​using the Liffey as a place to wash and defecate. It was Ormond who established a formal quay line and street on the Liffey Quays, with buildings facing the river in the European way.

The Great Courtyard, Dublin Castle, published July 1792, James Malton. Photograph: Sepia Times / Universal Images Group via Getty

Powerscourt House, Dublin, published July 1795, James Malton.  Photograph: Sepia Times / Universal Images Group via Getty

Powerscourt House, Dublin, published July 1795, James Malton. Photograph: Sepia Times / Universal Images Group via Getty

The Age of Ancestry led others to follow Ormond’s example. The years between 1714 and 1830, when four kings Georges reigned on the throne, were a golden age for the architecture of the city. The construction of thoroughfares by the Wide Streets Commission, as well as a housing boom, made Dublin a much grander place, arguably the second largest city in the British Empire. Architects such as James Gandon, Thomas Cooley, and Edward Lovett Pearce worked here, and most of our large public buildings, such as the Four Courts, Customs House, and Town Hall, were built during this time. Many builders and artisans were Irish, often from Dublin itself.

Henrietta Street was one of the first Georgian developments. (This is the subject of three beautiful new books published by Dublin City Council.) However, the company moved south of the Liffey after Leinster House was built for the Earl of Kildare. Townhouses have been built around new squares, allowing residents to enjoy beautiful gardens in the center. Merrion Square, St Stephen’s Green and Fitzwilliam Square have become Dublin’s hottest addresses.

Iconic streets lined with largely uniform brick townhouses with beautiful doorways framed by transoms give the Georgian town its character. Although the houses vary in size, the style remains refined and tasteful, without too much adornment or fuss. As VS Pritchett once remarked, “The tall Georgian windows, the pilaster doors, the beautiful transoms, have a family dignity intact through extravagance or pomp. “

Malton described Dublin as one of the most beautiful European capitals

At the end of the 18th century, Dublin was the second largest city on these islands. The key elements of this new city were captured by a young architectural designer called James Malton. His 25 aquatint prints form a striking group portrait of the city in the 1790s, just before London returned to power with the Act of Union in 1800.

Malton described Dublin as one of the most beautiful European capitals. There are wide thoroughfares lined with elegant buildings, opulent squares of red brick terraced houses, and tall public buildings. His paintings are the bare bones of a large Dublin drawing room. (The Irish Times once described them as “ubiquitous to the point of invisibility.”) But Malton was as much a salesman as he was an artist. He has always had an eye on the market, hence the “atmosphere of Arcadian clarity” – the expression of Maurice Craig – which shines through these engravings. The artist largely ignored the reality of life on the streets of the city.

The Parliament House, Dublin, published November 1793, James Malton.  Photograph: Sepia Times / Universal Images Group via Getty

The Parliament House, Dublin, published November 1793, James Malton. Photograph: Sepia Times / Universal Images Group via Getty

In producing a new book on Malton, Djinn von Noorden and I wanted to give readers a broader context than they might hope to find in a traditional work of art history. So, we asked writers and historians David Dickson, Kathryn Milligan, Graham Hickey, and Merlo Kelly to contribute essays. Their elegant reflections enhance our understanding of Malton’s feat.

For example, Kathryn Milligan draws our attention to a large pineapple in the window of the Fruit Warehouse on South William Street. This part of the city was, she writes, “supported by a market of luxury goods imported into the city to supply the best tables”. Our book also tells the rather miserable story of the artist himself. A London adventurer who threw himself into Dublin, James Malton came out broke and died, childless and single, at the age of 38.

All he left us was the very idea of ​​Georgian Dublin.

Malton offers us a Dublin for our dreams. Like all fantasies, this is not entirely correct. Nowadays, no one embarking on such an enterprise would largely ignore the reality of life on our streets.

We also asked historian and urban planning consultant Dr Diarmuid Ó Gráda to write an essay that will serve as an invigorating counterpoint to the heavily retouched town of Malton. “Anger and despair can be dangerous emotions when combined with cold and hunger,” writes Ó Gráda. “Violence in the streets increased and there were times when the city got out of hand. In Malton’s view of Beaux Walk, an unofficial marriage market for the well-to-do, Ó Gráda notes the presence of two sneaker-girls, in rags and barefoot. “They are a far cry from sophisticated walkers.” To my shame, I had never noticed the girls, whose presence seems almost subversive.

Gráda notes that Dublin was a dangerous place where riots were rife. “The housekeepers were encouraged to keep a blunderbuss on hand. Between 1780 and 1795, 242 thieves were hanged. Kidnappings were common, with the victims only four years old. A woman who tried to rob three children on Francis Street has been executed. “Others were thrown into the Liffey, had their ears cut off, or were dragged naked down the gutter.” Boys and girls were often abducted by beggars. “A favorite stratagem was to disfigure them, to awaken compassion in the chaplains. Limbs could be broken during this process.

Malton offers us a Dublin for our dreams. Like all fantasies, this is not entirely correct. Nowadays, no one embarking on such an enterprise would largely ignore the reality of life on our streets. However, the artist, his engravings and the city they represent retain the power to inspire us today.

When people who are citizens dare to imagine a more ambitious future, great things can happen. The Duke of Ormond is widely remembered. Much less is known about the man who captured Ormond’s legacy in an investigation of Dublin at the height of his heyday. It’s a shame, because Malton has an important message for all of us. As architect Tony Reddy recently told me, “James Malton challenges us to create buildings and places that citizens could remember with pride and affection two hundred years from now. “

We ignore it at our peril.

Trevor White is director of the Little Museum of Dublin. Malton’s Views of Dublin and A Little History of the Future of Dublin are both published by Martello Publishing


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Belle Terre Elementary Teacher of the Year: Natalie Muldoon https://optimalj.com/belle-terre-elementary-teacher-of-the-year-natalie-muldoon/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://optimalj.com/belle-terre-elementary-teacher-of-the-year-natalie-muldoon/ Natalie Muldoon’s daughter, in 8th grade, often quotes her own teachers, dating back as far as preschool. Her youngest daughter has teachers who have helped her overcome difficult challenges. It’s a reminder of how important a good teacher can be in a child’s life. “I would say my main strength is my belief that everyone […]]]>

Natalie Muldoon’s daughter, in 8th grade, often quotes her own teachers, dating back as far as preschool. Her youngest daughter has teachers who have helped her overcome difficult challenges. It’s a reminder of how important a good teacher can be in a child’s life.

“I would say my main strength is my belief that everyone is a ‘math person’. I believe in telling students that they are good at math. They should be allowed to explore and think about mathematics. “

– NATALIE MULDOON, teacher of the year at Belle Terre elementary school

“These lessons can last a lifetime,” wrote Muldoon, an academic coach at Belle Terre Elementary School, in a personal essay for his candidacy as teacher of the year. “I am inspired to be an educator who can motivate students like my daughters. I pray that they will continue to be positively influenced by amazing educators. “

Muldoon has been at Belle Terre Elementary for as long as it has been, since 2005, and taught Indian Trails K-8 for a year before moving to Belle Terre. She taught in Fort Lauderdale for five years before moving to Flagler County and is ESE certified with endorsements for teaching gifted students and ESOL students.

In some years, as a teacher, she taught gifted students and students with learning difficulties in the same classroom, an experience of which she is particularly proud. “I was able to grow both populations of students,” she wrote.

Muldoon also takes pride in helping students understand a subject many children dread – math.

Nathalie Muldoon. Photo courtesy of Flagler Schools

“I would say my main strength is my true belief that everyone is a ‘mathematician,’ she wrote. “I believe in telling students that they are good at math. They should be allowed to explore and think about mathematics. They need to know that it is okay to make mistakes and that you don’t have to be quick to solve problems to be a mathematician. “

She takes on additional tasks, conducts training sessions for other teachers and initiates projects – such as Operation SOS (Supporting Our Soldiers), which has collected donations in partnership with the VFW for the military; as well as science fairs and the Mathematics Olympics, among others.

“A big part of the teaching is that there are always opportunities to embark on other projects and adventures,” she wrote.

She has strived throughout her career to be a leader.

“I feel my teachers, students and administrators know they can trust me to lead by example,” she wrote. “They know I am being honest and will always take the time to listen and consider the perspectives when I am looking for a solution.”


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Oprah and Brené Brown talk about fear, connection and self-expression https://optimalj.com/oprah-and-brene-brown-talk-about-fear-connection-and-self-expression/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 14:40:20 +0000 https://optimalj.com/oprah-and-brene-brown-talk-about-fear-connection-and-self-expression/ Megastar author, teacher and podcast host Brené Brown and Oprah first sat down in 2013 to explore the courage it takes to be vulnerable. Brené’s revolutionary new book, Heart Atlas, draws on more than 20 years of pioneering research to explore and expand the vocabulary of feelings. Oprah and Brené, who have met several times […]]]>

Megastar author, teacher and podcast host Brené Brown and Oprah first sat down in 2013 to explore the courage it takes to be vulnerable. Brené’s revolutionary new book, Heart Atlas, draws on more than 20 years of pioneering research to explore and expand the vocabulary of feelings. Oprah and Brené, who have met several times over the past few years, recently got together to talk about fear, connections, the state of our country and much more.


Oprah: Welcome, Brené! The first conversation you and I had together almost nine years ago was also the first episode in our history. Super soul Podcast. And I’ve heard that the two-part interview has been downloaded 4.2 million times!

Brené Brown: Wow!

OW: It tells me that what you put out in the world is something people are hungry for, and you did it again with Heart Atlas. You open the book with this epigraph from Rumi: “The heart is the sea, the tongue is the shore. »Is this the organizing principle of the book?

BB: Our hearts are seas of expansion, of emotion, of experience. At some point, these emotions and experiences need to be articulated. The tongue is like a life jacket. But often people are not equipped with the words to describe what they are feeling.

OW: You’ve done a lot of research on this.

BB: Yes. About 15 years ago, we surveyed over 7,000 people, asking them to make a list of all the emotions they could recognize and name. Most people could only identify three: happy, mad, and sad. I found myself thinking, What does it mean if we don’t have a vocabulary as broad and deep as the human experience?

OW: Obviously you’ve been thinking about one version of this for a long time. In the book, there is a photo of you from 1984 alongside an essay you wrote. You ask, “Why do we feel the pain that we feel?” It was when you were in your first year in college.

BB: For me, survival growing up was about grasping the connection between emotion, behavior and thought. As the oldest of four children in a volatile home, to protect myself and my siblings, I needed to understand what comments or behaviors were going to trigger something.

OW: You thought you were good at evaluating this, didn’t you?

BB: I learned to refine this ability to the point that I could read the play and say: Uh-oh. We have five minutes before all hell breaks loose. Today my therapist would call it hypervigilance.

OW: Your name is cartographer and the title of your book contains the word atlas. Why this analogy?

BB: I am obsessed with cartography. In my last three books, I told readers that I am a cartographer, which means: I give you my research and my findings to help you find your way. But the truth is, I’m on the road with you. I’m not leading you, I stumble next to you. In this book, I wanted to convey that we are all cartographers, we have to be the cartographers of our own lives.

OW: So true. For this last project, you worked with a team of therapists, educators, researchers, students and community leaders, all sharing experiences around emotion. It had to be powerful.

BB: It all started with you and me several years ago when we took the “Gifts of Imperfection” online course. Over 65,000 people have taken the course, generating hundreds of thousands of data points. The team broke it down to find answers to this question: “What human emotions or experiences do people have trouble naming with precision?” The list was long, but we ultimately narrowed it down to a core group of them – around 87 – which I explored in the book.

OW: Why is it important, for example, that we know the distinction between being stressed and being overwhelmed, or as you say, “in the weeds” versus “blown out”?

BB: I quote the German philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein in the book, who said: “The limits of my language mean the limits of my world. Language does not only communicate emotions; he shapes them. So when I use a word to describe how I feel, my body will often follow my language. If I use hyperbole and say “I’m stressed” to “I’m overwhelmed”, I often make a self-fulfilling prophecy.

OW: What you’re urging us to do is expand the vocabulary with which we communicate our feelings so that we can better understand ourselves and accurately express what’s going on – the right words provide a gateway to psychosocial well-being. .

BB: Yes. Imagine having severe pain in your shoulder, but when you got to the orthopedist’s office, your mouth was sealed with duct tape and your hands were tied behind your back. You would be unable to tell the doctor what was wrong. Language is a portal to universes of new choices and second chances. I’ve been studying affects and emotions forever, and yet I have a hard time with it, mostly because I have a super sensitive nervous system and can use exaggerated, even reckless, language when I’m scared, which is not a configuration for a successful decision-making.

A 1984 college paper by Brené.

Brène Brown

OW: You talk about a link between shame and perfectionism. It surprised me. Can you explain

BB: I do all of this leadership work in organizations where people don’t have that relationship and are intentionally building perfectionist cultures. And then they say, “There is no innovation or creativity. What’s going on? “Well, shame kills creativity and innovation; perfectionism is a defense mechanism against shame. If I look perfect, I can avoid or minimize shame, judgment and blame.

OW: You’ve researched worry and concluded that it’s not a useful coping mechanism. But how can we keep from worrying needlessly? It’s hard!

BB: Those of us who worry excessively often think it’s useful which it doesn’t, on top of that we think we have no control over it. Worry is defined as a chain of negative thoughts about bad things that might happen in the future. When you study people who have overcome their tendency to worry, it’s all about checking reality and taking a step back. In other words, asking ourselves if all worrying is helping or hurting. Do I have enough data to panic? Even if I do, is panicking helpful? The answer is always no.

OW: You write that love and belonging are irreducible needs for everyone. And in their absence, there is suffering. All around us there are people who are suffering, who are unhappy, angry, who feel that they no longer belong. Is that how you see it?

BB: We’re adrift, I think, spiritually, emotionally, physically, cognitively. We are not tied down. The world is moving faster than we, as a social species, can handle, and in a way that leads to separation. We have confused hyper-communication with real human connection.

OW: What is the solution?

BB: We’re desperately trying to find a safe port somewhere out there, but that port is really within us. Meanwhile, a lot of very smart people see that we are lost and have created external ports that offer quick and artificial solutions – really a false sense of place and connection.

OW: And these smart people are exploiting this disconnect?

BB: When vulnerability is not mutual and reciprocal, it can be exploited or, as Anne Lamott says, “aid is the sunny side of control”.

OW: How did we get there? It did not happen overnight.

BB: A lot of people won’t agree with me, but if you don’t turn to your painful story and own it, it owns you. In this country, if we don’t look to our collective history around inequality and own it, it will continue to own us. And if you look at the way the pain has got over us right now, you’ll see that it’s being exploited in truly destructive ways.

OW: To the point where we literally don’t have a shared reality anymore.

BB: Yeah, and that’s by design. There is a school district in Texas that now says that if we are to teach the Holocaust, we have to teach the opposite point of view. The is no opposing point of view. It is a kind of white male power that is maintained using fear. It is to make a last fight, and the last fights are bloody; we are in the middle of it. What you feel is despair.

OW: Our systems and institutions are under threat.

BB: Yes; it is a real daily challenge to democracy, to science, to literature, to history, to education.

OW: How do we reattach and save ourselves?

BB: The only answer I know of is self-awareness.

OW: That’s why Heart Atlas is so important, because what it ultimately offers is a greater awareness of our feelings and the tools to express them. What do you hope readers will leave the book thinking about?

BB: We are emotional beings. Thinking and acting are not a shotgun, they are strapped in the trunk. It is the emotion that is behind the wheel. I did not understand everything before writing this book. If we don’t understand our own emotional landscapes, we cannot build a culture of connection.

OW: In the meantime, who do you turn to for wisdom and perspective?

BB: I come back to the feminist activist and cultural critic bell hooks, who diagnoses many of us as being deprived of “lack of love”. Our lack of abject love, she said, can only be healed through forgiveness, compassion, community.

OW: Oh, this is so good! Thanks, Brené.

BB: Thanks Oprah.

Random penguin house

Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connection and the Language of Human Experience

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JK Rowling faces new controversy after Jon Stewart criticizes his anti-Semitic tropes in Harry Potter https://optimalj.com/jk-rowling-faces-new-controversy-after-jon-stewart-criticizes-his-anti-semitic-tropes-in-harry-potter/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 18:56:53 +0000 https://optimalj.com/jk-rowling-faces-new-controversy-after-jon-stewart-criticizes-his-anti-semitic-tropes-in-harry-potter/ Jon Stewart has criticized the already besieged JK Rowling for the goblins who run the Gringotts Bank in his Harry Potter film series, calling them an obvious anti-Semitic trope. The former host of The Daily Show raised the question on the Dec. 16 episode of his podcast, The Problem with Jon Stewart. Stewart, who is […]]]>

Jon Stewart has criticized the already besieged JK Rowling for the goblins who run the Gringotts Bank in his Harry Potter film series, calling them an obvious anti-Semitic trope.

The former host of The Daily Show raised the question on the Dec. 16 episode of his podcast, The Problem with Jon Stewart.

Stewart, who is Jewish, wondered why Rowling chose to “throw Jews in there to run the fucking underground bank” in a fictional world where people “can ride dragons and have pet owls.”

The Harry Potter author is no stranger to controversy and has been canceled for his comments regarding transgender issues.

Jon Stewart (pictured), who is Jewish, wondered why Rowling chose to ‘throw Jews in there to run the fucking underground bank’ in a fictional world where people ‘can ride dragons and have owls of company “

Stewart called Goblins an obvious anti-Semitic trope and asked why more people hadn't followed suit.  Pictured is a film from the first Harry Potter film

Stewart called Goblins an obvious anti-Semitic trope and asked why more people hadn’t followed suit. Pictured is a film from the first Harry Potter film

Stewart, 59, said the banker goblin characters are based on caricatures of Jews from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, an infamous anti-Semitic text that claims to show a Jewish plan for world domination.

“This is how you know the Jews are always where they are,” Stewart said in the episode before lamenting the reluctance of those he spoke to to recognize the resemblance.

“I just want to show you a cartoon. And they’re like, “Oh, look at this, this is from Harry Potter!” And you’re like, “No, it’s a caricature of a Jew from an anti-Semitic book.” JK Rowling thought, ‘Can we get these guys to run our bank?’ ‘

Harry Potter author JK Rowling (pictured) is no stranger to the controversy and has been called off for comments regarding transgender issues

Harry Potter author JK Rowling (pictured) is no stranger to the controversy and has been called off for comments regarding transgender issues

An illustration of The Protocols of the Elders Zion

An original illustration by JK Rowling, sketched before Warner Brothers started making the movies

In the photo on the right is an illustration from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, an anti-Semitic text that claims to show a Jewish plan for world domination. Pictured at left is a sketch of JK Rowling from Harry Potter visiting Gringotts Bank in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, long before Warner Brothers took on the film franchise

When he first saw the Harry Potter films, Stewart said he expected other customers in the theater to “be like” shit, she didn’t, in a Wizarding World, to just throw Jews in there to run the fucking underground bank. “And everyone was like” wizards. “

Stewart isn’t the first to call out the goblins – in 2020, Saturday Night Live comedian Pete Davidson expressed similar frustrations.

In the Harry Potter books and films, he said, “the woods are controlled by centaurs, the schools are run by wizards and ghosts, but who controls the banks … Jews of course – of little Jewish goblins with a giant nose “.

Twitter polled the goblin characters before they were even mentioned by the comedians.

A user from December 2019, for example, asks “Why did you give goblin money with a hook nose, Joanne?” “

Another joked: “If you like grateful slaves and hook-nosed banking goblins, you’ll love Harry Potter and the genre’s biological essentialism.”

Rowling, 56, has previously been charged with transphobia after mocking an article online in June 2020 that used the words “menstruating people” instead of “women.”

The possibility that the goblins who run the Gringotts Bank in the Harry Potter universe are crude Jewish stereotypes was raised long before Jon Stewart mentioned the issue in his podcast.

The possibility that the goblins who run the Gringotts Bank in the Harry Potter universe are crude Jewish stereotypes was raised long before Jon Stewart mentioned the issue in his podcast.

Twitter polled the goblin characters before they were even mentioned by the comedians

Twitter polled the goblin characters before they were even mentioned by the comedians

A user from December 2019, for example, asks

A user from December 2019, for example, asks “Why did you give goblin money with a hook nose, Joanne?” “

Another joked:

Another joked: “If you like grateful slaves and hook-nosed banking goblins, you’ll love Harry Potter and the genre’s biological essentialism.”

She then defended herself against the allegations in a heated essay, but has been criticized by some since.

Last week, she hit back at a claim on a U.S. website that she believed there were only two genders.

Rowling wrote: “Small but important point: I never said there were only two genres. There are countless gender identities.

“The question at the heart of this debate is whether sex or gender identity should form the basis for decisions on safeguarding, service provision, sports categories and other areas in which women and girls currently have legal rights and protections.

Rowling, 56, was previously charged with transphobia after mocking an article online in June 2020 that used the words

Rowling, 56, has previously been charged with transphobia after mocking an article online in June 2020 that used the words ‘menstruating people’ instead of ‘women’

In 2020, JK Rowling shared a number of articles regarding biological essentialism and the de-transition of transgender people.

In 2020, JK Rowling shared a number of articles regarding biological essentialism and the de-transition of transgender people.

“The use of the words ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ indifferently masks the central question of this debate.

“If you’re interested in what I actually said, see this – (where I literally say ‘trans lives matter’ and ‘trans rights are human rights.’).

Over the past few weeks, a debate has erupted over whether or not Rowling will appear in Harry Potter’s upcoming reunion on Sky.

It was revealed that in clips from the New Years’ special, the stars praised “the power of her writing” and that she would appear in archive footage.

She is also seen in a 2019 segment discussing the difficult struggle to find an actor to play Harry during the casting of the first film, The Philosopher’s Stone.

The highly anticipated reunion sees Daniel joining fellow leaders Emma Watson, who played Hermione Granger, and Rupert Grint, who played Ron Weasley, along with a host of co-stars marking 20 years since the franchise first aired. .

Despite the star-studded participation, the author of the hit stratospheric franchise was not present at the special reunion – sparking outrage from some fans who accused the creators of trying to erase him because of his opinions.


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