Essay about life – Optimal J http://optimalj.com/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 03:12:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://optimalj.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-24T001514.613-150x150.png Essay about life – Optimal J http://optimalj.com/ 32 32 Dolly Parton fans may have to wait until the show’s end to catch the country’s superstar https://optimalj.com/dolly-parton-fans-may-have-to-wait-until-the-shows-end-to-catch-the-countrys-superstar/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 02:05:52 +0000 https://optimalj.com/dolly-parton-fans-may-have-to-wait-until-the-shows-end-to-catch-the-countrys-superstar/ Dolly Parton fans may have to wait until the very end of the 2021 Emmy Awards if they want to catch the nation’s superstar as a presenter. Parton, heralded as one of dozens of top celebrities who will showcase golden statuettes during the evening, would hand out one of the newest categories. Dolly Parton | […]]]>

Dolly Parton fans may have to wait until the very end of the 2021 Emmy Awards if they want to catch the nation’s superstar as a presenter. Parton, heralded as one of dozens of top celebrities who will showcase golden statuettes during the evening, would hand out one of the newest categories.

Dolly Parton | Getty Images / Getty Images for ACM

Dolly Parton won her first Emmy Award this year

Parton won her first Emmy Award at the Creative Arts Emmy Awards, which took place on Sunday, September 12.


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On “Martita, I remember you” by Sandra Cisneros https://optimalj.com/on-martita-i-remember-you-by-sandra-cisneros/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 17:09:18 +0000 https://optimalj.com/on-martita-i-remember-you-by-sandra-cisneros/ THROUGHOUT THE 20th century, in the days of the Latin American avant-garde and later during the so-called “boom”, a number of Latin American writers escaped oppressive dictatorships by fleeing. in Europe. Some have taken permanent residence, and all have written about their experiences. Among them were Julio Cortázar and José Donoso, whose novels (Hopscotch [1963] […]]]>

THROUGHOUT THE 20th century, in the days of the Latin American avant-garde and later during the so-called “boom”, a number of Latin American writers escaped oppressive dictatorships by fleeing. in Europe. Some have taken permanent residence, and all have written about their experiences. Among them were Julio Cortázar and José Donoso, whose novels (Hopscotch [1963] and The Garden next door [1981]) feature Latin American expats drinking, fucking and philosophizing in Paris, Sitges and Madrid. Sandra Cisneros’ latest novel tackles this familiar milieu – a Latin American artist living in Paris – but transforms it by describing it from the point of view of a female protagonist of North American origin (Corina, a Mexican American who, like Cisneros , grew up in Chicago).

Martita, I remember you / Martita, you recuerdo (in English, with a Spanish translation by Liliana Valenzuela) contains many of Cisneros’ classic themes, which will be familiar to readers of his collections of poetry like My mean nasty ways (1987), in which a section entitled “Other countries” is composed almost entirely of poems set in Europe with titles such as “December 24 Paris – Notre-Dame” and “Bel homme – France”. Cisneros herself traveled extensively in Europe in the 1980s, when a scholarship from the National Endowment for the Arts enabled her to complete the manuscript of her bestselling 1984 novel. Mango Street House in Hydra, a stay that she recounts in her memories A house of mine: stories of my life (2015). Shortly after the scholarship, she spent a year in Sarajevo, where she befriended a woman named Jasna, to whom she dedicated the essay “Loose Woman”: “[A]s if our lives depended on it. When the Yugoslav wars broke out, Cisneros spoke out against the rape of Bosnian women in a 1993 speech at the International Women’s Day rally in San Antonio, Texas, titled “Who Wants Stories Now “(Collected in A house of mine), who mixes a cry of peace with her personal reflections on the beauty of the daily life she has experienced while living there.

Many of the themes Cisneros tackles in her memoirs – the fears and risks in the young artist’s life, the dream of “living with her pen”, the skirmishes with men who wanted more or less of her than she did. was willing to give, parties and quiet friendships with people who read and encouraged him to write, and who gave him the courage to travel to Europe in the first place – animate the pages of Martita, I remember you, giving it the feeling of a lived experience.

Quiet truths fill the pages of the thin but memorable book. The story of Corina, an aspiring writer and now mother of two middle-aged children in Chicago, unfolds through a series of memories and old letters that she unearths between herself and two friends with whom she lived in Paris: the determined Italian expatriate Paola and the Argentine Marta from the title of the news. Cisneros often portrays herself as a working class writer; when Corina first meets Paola and Marta they are pretty and tanned – not from skiing in Geneva, as they initially claim, but from their job handing out oil and towels in a tanning salon for wealthy women on avenue de Wagram. Meanwhile, Corina, like the young Cisneros, is the daughter of an American-Mexican upholsterer in Chicago who “awaits the letter from an artists’ colony” and hopes to succeed as a writer – a dream she talks while crashing with Marta in a windowless room with a sunken mattress, or on the floor with the Argentinian puppeteers José Antonio and Carlos, where, only by running away, she dubiously stands out as “the only one woman who slept here and who has not been fucked ”. As if sown with landmines, the pages are filled with muted explosions of violence and pain: secret abortions, allusions to domestic violence, adventures with married men, grief, divorce and assaults that women avoid by walking “arm in arm.” arms, the way women walk together in Latin America, to tell men that we are good girls, stay away, leave us alone.

As always, Cisneros is adept at describing the feelings, sensations and pitfalls of young women’s lives: “We were waiting for something to happen. Isn’t that what all women do until they learn not to? Corina asks from the start. Later, describing her homesickness, she wrote, “There’s a hole in my heart, like someone took a cigarette and pushed it through, clearly on the other side. After a phone call to her father, she brings back her “heart whistling like a harmonica”. Both descriptions tap into the relationship between mind, body, and spirit, challenging Cartesian dualism by expressing how emotions are experienced through physical sensations in the body. It is a writing that bridges the sacred and the profane, as when Marta describes sex as “what religion is meant to be.” Like when the sun shines through the prettiest colored glass in the church window and you know God is not inside the building, he is inside you. […] My heart lit up inside his and hers inside mine like el Sagrado Corazón. To read this novel is to fall on nuggets: “Tac tac tac chante son hammer. My father hums or mumbles my mother’s name over and over, like a drowning man. Cisneros’ prose buzzes, full of personifications, metaphors and allusions, crisscrossing from Paris to Chicago in Mexico. His writing crosses languages, continents and time.

“If you run your finger across the world, at the same latitude as Chicago or near Paris, where I’m with Martita and her canoe bed.” To borrow a phrase from Jorge Luis Borges, the negation of time is one of Cisneros’ obsessions, and it’s hard to think of another writer who crosses the porous border between past and present with as much poetry as she does. Persistence of memory is a current that runs through all news, as is the importance of memory in sustaining our sense of self no matter how our plans and circumstances change. Long after the letters between Corina, Paola and Marta have dried up, “It’s like we’re talking, again, after all this time.” Even when faced with the impossibility of holding on, the feeling of love remains: “I don’t have a good memory, but I remember the emotions. How many days have we known each other? I do not even know. But I know that I grew up to love you very much. After years of separation, she describes their friendship as “pulling and pulling like the tides,” an invisible but powerfully enduring bond. Ultimately, she describes her stay in Paris as “those days I lived next to you, Martita”. It is within the framework of this youthful friendship that Corina discovers a sense of beauty and a kind of contagious joy that she will miss later in her adult life, drawing from it only through sensory impressions and the act of reading; as the elder Corina reports of her inability to read poetry with her husband, “I wonder how it is that a poem can say so many things so beautifully. I used to get sad to be the only witness to all this joy, because Richard is too tired to notice that sort of thing. But I got used to enjoying things on my own.

In Skin: Talking about sex, class and literature (1994), Dorothy Allison reflects: “Writers write for three reasons: fame, fortune and the love of a beautiful woman. […] But all that ever mattered was the women. Ultimately, Corina’s most transcendent relationships, the conversations of a lifetime, aren’t with the men she’s once had passionate affairs with, or the accidental miscarriage, or even with the man she’s been having. she ends up marrying – these are the ones with the women. Martita, I remember you is a love letter to female friendship, the brevity of which does not detract from the importance of its subject or the sheer pleasure of devouring it.

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Audrey Harris Fernández holds a PhD in Hispanic Languages ​​and Literatures from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and is a lecturer at UCLA and California State University, Los Angeles. She co-translated (with Matthew Gleeson) Amparo Dávila The guest and other stories (New directions, 2018).


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Close-up and meeting with women artists at the Fondation Beyeler https://optimalj.com/close-up-and-meeting-with-women-artists-at-the-fondation-beyeler/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 04:00:59 +0000 https://optimalj.com/close-up-and-meeting-with-women-artists-at-the-fondation-beyeler/ Visual arts updates Sign up for myFT Daily Digest to be the first to know about the latest in the visual arts. In Mary Cassatt’s 1878 painting “In the Lodge”, the American artist captures the spectacle of looking into late 19th century Paris through a complex web of gazes. As a viewer, we observe the […]]]>

Visual arts updates

In Mary Cassatt’s 1878 painting “In the Lodge”, the American artist captures the spectacle of looking into late 19th century Paris through a complex web of gazes. As a viewer, we observe the side profile of a woman at the opera house looking through her glasses at an unseen audience member in front of her. In the background, a man leans from his box to try to spy on the woman through his own binoculars. The image is a scene from modern life, but it is also a portrait that captures the confidence of the viewer.

The Cassatt Operator is one of many works by eight female painters and a photographer who play with portraiture conventions in a lovely new exhibition, To close, at the Beyeler Foundation in Basel. Spanning from 1870 to the present day, the exhibition examines parallel developments in Western art that have affected the way we understand the human figure: the rise of the professional female artist and the estrangement of the portrait from her. long-standing goal of faithfully reproducing the likeness of the model.

By mapping a formidable line of women working with the figurative image – Cassatt, Berthe Morisot, Paula Modersohn-Becker, Lotte Laserstein, Frida Kahlo, Alice Neel, Marlene Dumas, Cindy Sherman and Elizabeth Peyton – the exhibition highlights the contribution from these artists to the radical transformation of the genre.

Refreshingly, the exhibition resists imposing an all-encompassing “feminine gaze” on the works of these women by grouping their works together through common themes. Instead, each artist is assigned their own room to emphasize that they have produced art under particular circumstances – as the varied treatment of the human figure reveals throughout the exhibition.

‘Lucie Léon au piano’ (1892) by Berthe Morisot © Christie’s Images, London / Scala, Florence

We begin in the Paris of the 1870s, where decorum dictated that Cassatt and Morisot limited themselves to capturing their friends and family primarily in domestic settings (Cassatt’s “In the Lodge” is one of his rare paintings of the sphere. public). But that did not prevent them from engaging in the formal experiments of their Impressionist circle. Morisot in particular breathes dynamism into interior scenes through the rapid application of paint: the vivid dark blue background rendered in rapid brushstrokes contrasts with the white arms and face of the bored young girl practicing painting. music in “Lucie Léon au piano” (1892); the vivid details of the lace garments and the expressively raised eyebrows imbue the young woman reclining in her chair with a quick wit in “Girl on a Divan” (1885).

Very early on, we also see modernist artists wresting the female figure from the stereotypes of art history. The German Modersohn-Becker, one of the first female artists to portray herself naked, rejects the eroticization of her body in “Self-Portrait (Semi-Nude with Amber Necklace II)” (1906). She renders her nude form in simplified forms with a dark, almost mask-like face, confidently meeting our gaze, mimicking what the artist has described as the “masculine and daring” attitude of the modern woman.

An oil painting of the nude upper half of a woman

‘Semi-Nude with Amber Necklace II’ (1906) by Paula Modersohn-Becker © Kunstmuseum Basel, Martin P Bühler

Working in the Berlin of the 1920s, Laserstein also presents herself as a new emancipated woman. She claims a position in the canon of art history with the remarkable work “In My Studio” (1928), which shows the artist at his easel, cropped hair and androgynous air, in a profound sense. concentration as she paints the nude model. stretched out in front of her, whose radiant body rendered in sensual realism recalls the paintings of Titian.

Neel’s penchant for painting elongated, fleshy forms produces what is perhaps the most confronting nude on display. In “Pregnant Woman” (1971), the American twists the traditional odalisque pose by representing her daughter-in-law lying naked on a sofa, weighed down by a heavy and distended belly. The model’s outspoken expression expresses Neel’s perspective on pregnancy as “a fundamental fact of life”, but is also an excellent example of the intimacy the artist has created with her subjects as a chronicler of the New York daily.

Through this variety of the human form, the exhibition traces the radically changing vision of the subject through this period. We are seeing definitions of ‘individuality’, once a vital feature of portraiture and in particular the self-portrait, shifting, shattered and sometimes completely rejected as we move from the modern age to the age of social media.

For Kahlo working in Mexico City from the 1920s to the 1950s, individuality meant a highly constructed character within imaginary settings. “Self-Portrait with Bonito” (1941), painted shortly after his father’s death, shows the artist posing against a backdrop of a rich jungle teeming with plants and insects, a scene that contrasts her black dress and somber expression. It is an image that testifies to the deep fascination that the artist had for the cycle of life and death throughout his career.

Photograph of a woman with long blonde hair and a stetson in front of a river and tree scene

“Untitled” (2008) by Cindy Sherman © Cindy Sherman

These symbolically charged self-portraits are hardly real, but they are nonetheless authentic. Compare how different this constructed identity is from Sherman’s photographs, where the artist is buried in so many layers of disguise that one could hardly qualify his works as “self-portrait”. The concept of individuality is further blurred in the practice of Dumas, born in South Africa, who gleans her subjects in the media and enjoys separating images from their origins. The artist’s intense and paint-smeared faces, often depicted close-up, with snarling mouths and large eyes, are totally foreign to the newspaper photographs from which they are derived.

An oil painting in free brush strokes of a young woman in a straw hat and pale dress sitting on a patio in front of a lawn

“Jeune femme tricotant” (c1883) by Berthe Morisot © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource / Scala, Florence

Coming finally to the little jewelry-like Peyton paintings, one can’t help but feel a sense of coming full circle. They have a common artistic language with the previous pieces: both his “Lara, garden, autumn” (2020) and “Jeune femme à tricoter” by Morisot (c1883) depict a figure in the garden with colorful spotted brush strokes. , two self-determined women contained in their dream world. The young man rendered in deep indigo in “Nick (La Luncheonette December 2002)” (2003) shares an introspective and brooding quality with Dumas’s blue portrait of the late singer Amy Winehouse (“Amy – Blue”, 2011). Here there is warmth and darkness, friends and strangers, studies of the individual but also of the collective.

As the critic Donatien Grau writes in his catalog essay on Peyton: “A portrait does not have to be the image of an individuality, conceived as an island that no one other than the portrait painter can access. A portrait can be the way to dive into the sea of ​​life.

As of January 2, foundationbeyeler.ch

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VIRUS JOURNAL: Thanks to COVID, an “anti-first day” of school | YourCentralValley.com KSEE24 https://optimalj.com/virus-journal-thanks-to-covid-an-anti-first-day-of-school-yourcentralvalley-com-ksee24/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 16:56:50 +0000 https://optimalj.com/virus-journal-thanks-to-covid-an-anti-first-day-of-school-yourcentralvalley-com-ksee24/ MAPLEWOOD, NJ (AP) – Three days before the first day of school, a text hit the nail on the head: The babysitter had exposed our three children to COVID. Robotically, I started to look at what the next few days would be like. Fill up with Tylenol and check the temperature. Hoping we’ll have another […]]]>

MAPLEWOOD, NJ (AP) – Three days before the first day of school, a text hit the nail on the head: The babysitter had exposed our three children to COVID. Robotically, I started to look at what the next few days would be like. Fill up with Tylenol and check the temperature. Hoping we’ll have another peak-free day. Tests on the fifth day. I wonder if every sniffle is a symptom.

I know this routine well now. Pandemic parenthood created it. The lack of vaccines for the youngest forces us to maintain it. I was looking at another pandemic pivot, and this one felt different. I’m sick of pivoting. I’m tired of figuring out how to make everyone resilient. And I had to say something out loud to these three.

It wasn’t just the first day. They would miss the first two weeks of school.

On my social media feeds, images from the first day keep arriving. Children in freshly ironed pleated uniforms with crisp white shirts. College students posing in trendy new outfits. Fresh haircuts. New glittering backpacks. Avengers lunch boxes. Unscuffed sneakers and smiles.

Our school shoes are still in their boxes. Our backpacks are packed, but there’s nowhere to go. Our uniforms always have their labels.

We are NOT smiling.

Text messages from football and softball teams share dozens of games we haven’t been able to play. We greet friends who come home from school through the windows. I imagine children sitting at desks protected from COVID, writing essays “about me” and drawing self-portraits. Will they all climb the wall and will our children miss? Will they be looking at this wall all year round, remembering when the world started to fall when they were stuck in the summer?

Three days go by, and we still haven’t heard from a professor. “Don’t worry,” the office told me. “Not much is happening during the first few days of school anyway.”

So many things, however.

When our world stopped in March 2020, when the daycare and school closed and we were parents and worked in parallel, there was adrenaline rush. One stop was different and scary, but we were there together. This time, we stopped alone. And we are alone.

Children are experienced pandemic children. They know that the routines that make up their life can evaporate in an instant. And as the days go by, with no camp or school or friends, they start to believe it’s happening again. Their grief is visible.

It shows in Maddie’s screams. The screams that interrupt an otherwise unfolding puzzle, or when she decides a hill is too much for her Frozen bike and her 3-year-old body. When we have mac and cheese instead of peanut butter and jelly, even though she asked for mac and cheese. When she wants chalk on the driveway but can’t find the pink chalk. She asks several times a day what day it is. She draws on the walls again, like last March. “I’m sick today,” she tells me, except that she isn’t. She carries her backpack to breakfast. And then she screams again, and this time I don’t know why.

It shows that Amelia has a brave face. Maddie is working on writing her name and her 8-year-old sister volunteers to help. Amelia cut out letters she can draw on and lay them out on the floor. She claims to be the president of her own iteration of the Baby-Sitters Club and is determined to take art classes with her little sister. Maddie screams and runs away. “Maddie isn’t listening to me,” she complains, then moped. The only smile I can get from her is when I share a text from another mother with information that two friends are in her class.

Rylan is the untouchable, rarely affected by anything. He, more than the other two, was ready for school. He worked for weeks to finish his three summer reading books, the hardest books he had ever read. He spent four hours editing his essay before day one. He remains unread and his anxiety grows. He wants a good desk, one in the center of the classroom. Will he be stuck in the back? What day is the gym? Who is in his class? He goes down hours after bedtime, complaining that his eyes are blinking and he can’t sleep. We breathe. It doesn’t help. – Mom, he said in a low voice. “What if Maddie has COVID and we have to be home for another 14 days?” “

I have no response.

On day 12, we have had enough. There will be no traditional first day of school for us this year. Reality has set in and we accept it. Almost.

I gather the kids and sit them on the porch steps, the same steps where we usually take our first photo of the first day of school every year. We’re taking an anti-first day of school photo, because that’s our experience this year. They complain, as they usually do.

“Show me how it feels to be stuck at home,” I coax her. They laugh, for a second. Then they make faces of monsters. They frown. I think someday when they flip through family photos, they’ll tell the story of missing the first two weeks of school and how mom made them take a stupid photo anyway.

Sometimes the best way to be resilient is to not be. So we sit down with our anger and wait for the day to pass or the end of quarantine. It doesn’t matter which one comes first.

___

Virus Diary, an occasional feature, presents the coronavirus pandemic through the eyes of Associated Press reporters around the world. Noreen Gillespie is AP’s Associate Editor-in-Chief for US News. Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/norgillespie



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Intellectually abusing the Afghan way of life https://optimalj.com/intellectually-abusing-the-afghan-way-of-life/ Sun, 12 Sep 2021 03:13:27 +0000 https://optimalj.com/intellectually-abusing-the-afghan-way-of-life/ Social and intellectual factors are the main contributors to the loss of faith; and since intellect and societies have changed the most in the West, the loss of faith is clearer and more pronounced there. that of Edward Gibbon The story of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire and that of David Hume […]]]>

Social and intellectual factors are the main contributors to the loss of faith; and since intellect and societies have changed the most in the West, the loss of faith is clearer and more pronounced there. that of Edward Gibbon The story of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire and that of David Hume Dialogue on natural religion are two books which are considered to be the intellectual work that has done more harm than any other work in undermining the faith.

Even great scholars like Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) and his concept that “God, soul and immortality can never be proven” attracted many followers at this time. Intellectuals undermined the growth of the faith, but the main social factors which in the 17e and 18e the centuries which contributed to the loss of faith are seen as the mentality of the working class, the concept of liberalism and the “anticlericalism” dictated by Karl Marx. What about Afghanistan today?

Afghanistan and the Afghan people are all absolute conformists and true believers in their faith. Regarding Afghanistan, we must keep these two things in mind: first, a strong faith in God unites the Afghan nation; and second, the clerics of this society are respected and liberalism has never guided and directed their way of life.

They did not go through the period of European emotional conversion to become like them, unconventional on one side or the other. They abhor Western democracy, not because they have read John Stuart Mill’s famous essay “On Liberty” (published in 1859) in which he speaks of the tyranny of the majority over the minority with the use of ” intellectual coercion ”, but only because they want to live and defend their own way of life. Mill asserted in this essay that “people come to power and, like the crowd of ages past, deny others the right to a difference of opinion.” One hundred and sixty-two years later, the Western world denies this right of difference of opinion to the Afghan people. The Western world accuses them of living in a medieval world at the 21st century, but it is their choice and their preference to shape their society as they wish. America has tried humanitarian intervention, it has tried democracy promotion, it has tried nation building, and most importantly it has tried the military counterterrorism and counterinsurgency strategies in Afghanistan – all of them. these American preferences failed. The Americans have failed to build a modern culture or impose their kind of order, a democratic order in Afghanistan by military means. What suggests to them that they can do it now using non-military means?

Afghans must be allowed to make their own choices about how they want to remain deeply religious, have strong faith in their traditions and customs, and formulate an Afghan society and conceive of the role of women in it. These are questions that must be decided by the Afghan people. To critics who do not see the Taliban as true representatives of the Afghans, my question is: if democracy involves one man, one voice, then how many Afghans would vote to make a BBC dictated way of life? and CNN in Afghanistan in case a fair referendum is called to determine this?

Are the BBCs and CNNs of this world also worried about what women are doing in Papua New Guinea and how they are being treated in the Solomon Islands or a country far away in Africa? Afghanistan is fed up with the military treatment of the Western world and it no longer has an appetite for “coercive intellectual mistreatment” by the Western world whose media continue to have no sense of what it takes to be an Afghan or live an Afghan life.

Americans would do well to understand that their “transformational agenda” for the world has failed. It has absolutely failed in Afghanistan and the Middle East and this has strengthened the regional and global strategic position of America’s competing great powers, the revisionist powers – China and Russia. These rising rival powers of America do not want transnational threats to pose a danger to their neighboring province or their former Soviet republics. In view of this Sino-Russian concern, the world must be assured that with their allies and partners, these two powers will be able to build a regional security policy that will guard against such a danger emanating from Afghanistan.

The transformation of human beings into political beings takes place when they get information. The battle for the polarization of ideas at the 17the and 18e centuries and its informational influence has transformed almost all Europeans into political beings. In the information age we live in today, Afghans are also exposed to the same secularizing influences to which European society has been exposed in the past. Afghanistan and its people need peace, opportunities for self-reliance and time to evolve and modernize – and the world must afford it.

There is no industrialization, no urbanization, little education. The Afghan people therefore need time to evolve as a society. For now, they want to shape and not adapt as a society. Let us not forget that the vision we now have of enlightenment – that it was a good thing, a step forward, a necessary step in the evolution of the modern world – was not the 19e view of the century. Not so long ago this age ended in guillotine and terror, not only during the Napoleonic period, but under the reins of Queen Victoria.

At the time of this article’s publication, the interim government of the Islamic Emirates of Afghanistan is believed to have been sworn in. On this occasion, I would like to quote two Islamic thinkers. Sayyid Jamal al-Din al-Afghani (1838-1897) who spoke of the need for reform in Islam. He addressed the ulemas and religious scholars of his time and asked them what they could call themselves advisers if they could read the religious text but did not know the causes of electricity or the principles that guided the steam engine. . He described them as a narrow wick candle “which does not enlighten those around him or enlighten others”. The other Muslim scholar was Muhammad Abduh (1849-1905) who served on the board of directors of al-Azhar Mosque, one of the most influential learning bodies in the Arab world. He has actively campaigned for girls’ education and for secular laws beyond Sharia law.

A golden age of Islam (8e to 14e century) ended with the collapse of the Abbasid Caliphate due to the Mongol invasion. For another golden age to begin, Muslim leaders not only in Afghanistan but around the world will need to realize that good policy is one that bends and adjusts to the demands of regional and global circumstances. A rigid policy, unsuited to the needs of the time, leads to discontent, public frustration, failure, siege, invasion and the end of such a policy.

Posted in The Express Tribune, September 12e, 2021.

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Lesson for the day: “What will become of the Afghan generation after September 11?” “ https://optimalj.com/lesson-for-the-day-what-will-become-of-the-afghan-generation-after-september-11/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 02:50:01 +0000 https://optimalj.com/lesson-for-the-day-what-will-become-of-the-afghan-generation-after-september-11/ This lesson of the day will help prepare students to participate in our live panel on September 30 at 1 p.m. EST on how September 11 shaped the generation that grew in its wake. You can register for the event here, and you can submit your questions here – we could use them during the […]]]>

This lesson of the day will help prepare students to participate in our live panel on September 30 at 1 p.m. EST on how September 11 shaped the generation that grew in its wake. You can register for the event here, and you can submit your questions here – we could use them during the panel.

Featured Article: “What will happen to the Afghan generation after September 11?“- a photo essay by Kiana Hayeri

In April 2021, President Biden announced that US troops would withdraw from Afghanistan by September 11, 2021. Following the announcement, Kiana Hayeri, a photojournalist, began documenting the end of 20 years of occupation of perspective of young Afghans who grew up in the decades following the US invasion in 2001.

In this lesson, you will see how six young people who had lived in a world of new freedoms and opportunities suddenly found themselves in a world changed with the rise of the Taliban. Then you will write a letter to one of the young people in the article, or their families, sharing how you connected with their story.

Discuss in class or in small groups:

  • What do you know about the war in Afghanistan? What about the withdrawal of American troops and the takeover of the Taliban?

  • Where did you get your information? Press articles? Social media? Talking with friends and family?

  • What questions are you asking yourself about what is going on?

If you need more information or background on what’s going on, start with our Lesson for the Day on America’s Longest War – Its Causes and Consequences.

The featured article focuses on youth stories. Watch this video of three young women sharing their stories of life in Afghanistan now, then answer the questions.

  • What was one of the emotional reactions you had to the video?

  • What is one thing you learned from the video?

  • What is the question you ask yourself after watching the video?

Read the article, then answer the following questions:

1. The authors describe the ways in which the lives of young Afghans are changing rapidly. What is an example or description of the introduction that helps you understand and visualize these changes?

2. The article begins with the story of childhood friends, Karim, Gul Ahmad and Saeed. What is one of the ways you connected with their story of work and friendship? Pick an image and quote that you think best illustrates this theme.

3. When asked what he wanted to be when he grew up, Gul Ahmad laughed. According to the article, why do you think he answered this way?

4. What were Esmat’s hopes and dreams for himself and for his family? Why do you think Esmat both hoped for a future, but was also aware that he might not live to see the future? Does this make you think of anything else that you have read, seen or experienced?

5. How did the subject of the play Maryam starred become even more relevant to her and the other actresses? What does this story demonstrate, both in real life and in the world of the play, about the fears that young women, like Maryam, have?

6. How did Naser Khan take a stand for his country? How did that put him in a dangerous situation during the American withdrawal?

7. The article ends by describing Kiana Hayeri’s last days in Kabul. Reading his experiences leaving Afghanistan, what more do you want to know? Think of a question you would like to ask Ms. Hayeri and submit it as a 30 second video using this form.

In the featured article, 17-year-old Maryam told Kiana Hayeri, the photographer: “If you write about this, please talk about the situation in Afghanistan. Why do you think Maryam felt it was important to share this with Ms. Hayeri? And why do you think Ms. Hayeri chose to include her plea in the essay?

Write a letter to one of the youth in the featured article. In your letter, tell that person what you learned from the stories and photographs of young people in Afghanistan. You can share how you felt as you read the words and see the faces of the people who live there now, and you can also let the person know how you personally connected with the stories you read. Then ask a question or two about that person’s life or current situation.

You can share your letter in the comments section of this article.

Additional teaching and learning opportunities


Learn more about the Daily Lesson here and find all of our daily lessons in this column.


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Wedding dress gift for medical staff becomes more meaningful https://optimalj.com/wedding-dress-gift-for-medical-staff-becomes-more-meaningful/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 18:38:00 +0000 https://optimalj.com/wedding-dress-gift-for-medical-staff-becomes-more-meaningful/ Free wedding dresses go to Bay Area medical workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, as a thank you. What would you like to know Regent event venue is accepting nominations for over 30 dresses to give away Applications are accepted until September 15 To appoint a Bay Area Healthcare Worker, contact The […]]]>

Free wedding dresses go to Bay Area medical workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, as a thank you.


What would you like to know

  • Regent event venue is accepting nominations for over 30 dresses to give away
  • Applications are accepted until September 15
  • To appoint a Bay Area Healthcare Worker, contact The Regent by email or call 813-571-2494

The Regent event venue is accepting nominations for over 30 dresses to offer. Some of these are show dresses, others still carry the tags.

Shannon Keil, CEO of The Regent helped bride-to-be Devyn Northe choose the perfect wedding dress.

“Whatever looks good on me, I don’t have a specific style,” Northe said. “I’m generally pretty straightforward to choose from.”

Keil suits his wives with joy and gratitude.

“What better way to say thank you than to wear these dresses and give them to them,” Keil said.

Thank you to the medical workers on the front lines of the pandemic.

“They are there everyday, they are there to take care of us, they are there to take care of our family members,” Keil said.

Keil thought dresses would be a great way to show gratitude.

“There’s tailoring, there’s more Greek, there’s simpler, there’s $ 3,000 couture dresses,” Keil said. “Anything from 0 to size 24.”

Credit: MEFMEDIA

The giveaway is open to medical workers in the Bay Area. You must be nominated.

Northe is a surgical nurse at the Brandon Regional Hospital. His floor also cares for COVID-19 patients.

“It means so much, you’d never know. When you’re trying to plan something like a wedding and it’s so stressful and you’re a COVID nurse on top of that, it’s a lot and there’s no way than you could ever thank someone for something like this, “Northe said.” It’s one of the most cherished parts of a wedding. “

Nurses like Northe would have a personal impact on Keil.

“I was recently released from the hospital with COVID pneumonia and acute respiratory failure and a local hospital here saved my life,” Keil said.

Keil’s doctors told her she was lucky to be alive.

“Whatever your higher power is, it gets you out of here,” he said because we don’t know, a miracle just happened, ”Keil said.

Helping healthcare workers find and then gift them the dress of their dreams now takes on new meaning.

“How can you say thank you when someone saved your life, so many of them as I can thank,” Keil said. “I’m going to do it because that’s how I’m going to bless them for all that they have blessed me.”

The blessings are felt on both sides.

“It brings so much joy, I don’t have to work overtime for a dress, I don’t have to worry, I don’t have any of those worries and these are beautiful dresses,” Northe said. .

Now to choose between the beautiful dresses.

“They deserve it, they walk in shoes that we couldn’t even understand,” Keil said.

Northe hopes to walk down the aisle in one of them.

“Have that special moment where she walks and he sees her and that she’s everything he’s ever expected and wished for, I have her on the rack. I have her story and so I’m ready for it. that she has it. “

Devyn and Matt will tie the knot in the fall of 2022.

“We’re going to give them a little bit of joy at a hard-to-find time right now,” Keil said.

Applications are accepted until September 15th. To appoint a Bay Area healthcare worker, contact The Regent by email or call 813-571-2494. Include the name, establishment where the person works, their phone number, and an essay of 500 words or less explaining why the person should be named.

The candidate should also include their contact details.


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Ten useful tips for writing a memorable essay https://optimalj.com/ten-useful-tips-for-writing-a-memorable-essay/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 07:38:10 +0000 https://optimalj.com/ten-useful-tips-for-writing-a-memorable-essay/ A memorable essay falls under the category of personal papers. Its primary objective is to describe a significant moment in the life of a writer and to demonstrate its importance. Although memorable essays are not common, they are prevalent in scholarship applications. Students may also have to write a memorable document when entering college. Therefore, […]]]>

A memorable essay falls under the category of personal papers. Its primary objective is to describe a significant moment in the life of a writer and to demonstrate its importance. Although memorable essays are not common, they are prevalent in scholarship applications. Students may also have to write a memorable document when entering college. Therefore, knowing how to write a successful and memorable essay is vitally important. Top rated experts essay writing service share ten practical tips for writing this type of paper.

Bring your mind back

Also known as personal statements, memorable essays are always based on a critical event that happened in the past.

First of all, try to think of great topics from the past. When you remember, ask yourself:

  • Is this event important to me?
  • Can I visualize it and create a cohesive piece?
  • Would I be able to make the audience relive what happened to me?

If you can answer these questions positively, you may have found the topic. Still, don’t rush to start writing the paper. We suggest that you create a list of moments first, which you can analyze in more depth.

Interview yourself

Once you’ve written the list of ideas, start interviewing yourself. The issues mentioned were preliminary. Now is the time to dig deeper. You see, memorable essays are based on specific and extraordinary events. But often writers misunderstand the purpose of these articles, believing that the more unique the topic, the more likely they are to get the highest rating.

In reality, memorable essays should describe noWhatyou did but Whyand How? ‘Or’ Whatyou did that and what emotionshe mentioned. Many papers containing the most commonplace the tasks got the highest marks because the writers focused on the emotional palette and memories invoked by those events.

Draw attention

What may seem fascinating to you may be boring to others. When writing a memorable article, you need to keep your audience in mind. This will help you keep them on the edge of their seats.

A great strategy to catch the curiosity of your readers is to start your article with a opening. Hooks can manifest themselves in various forms. They can come across as misconceptions, jokes, facts, or shocking statements. It is up to you to decide which approach will have the most substantial impact. We can only recommend that you analyze your audience and find out more about their interests and the language they use. Knowing them will allow you to tailor your writing style to the audience and compose a better piece in the long run.

Include epiphany

Likewise, it is crucial to maintain the enthusiasm of the readers throughout the document. You don’t want your audience to be captivated by a remarkable opening and yawning at the end of the paper.

To keep their interest, add an epiphany. a Epiphany is a moment of sudden awareness. We all have this “aha!” Moment, which uplifts our mood and makes us more vigorous. Think about such moments and spread them in your essay.

Keep the suspense

Suspense is another element that can get the audience to read your essay in one sitting. Your story can have a clear outline. However, it can be difficult to predict the emotions experienced by the perpetrator. And you can use it to keep the suspense going and keep the reader eagerly waiting to see what happens next.

Ensure a climax

As with fiction and narrative essays, a memorable article tends towards a climax event, turning point or moment of action. This often happens in the last section of the body part. The highest point is the highest stress point in a test. After that, the action immediately falls and the whole play ends, which has consequences for the climax. Such results can also lead to a simple revelation.

What about honesty?

Effective and impactful memorable essays often reveal moments of susceptibility. Honesty is decisive, showing your strengths and weaknesses. Of course, it can be difficult to admit that you are vulnerable, especially when writing an essay for an unknown committee. However, you don’t necessarily need to dive into the depths of your emotional state, revealing sensitive information about yourself. Even scratching the surface will.

Spice up with descriptive elements

Try to include descriptive elements when writing an essay. Sensory images and emotions can energize your story and allow readers to see what you saw, hear what you heard, feel what you felt, etc.

Don’t forget about character development

The people in your article should come alive and be interesting to read. If such characters play a pivotal role in your story, be sure to provide a brief description of them, mentioning any idiosyncrasies, such as bizarre language or unusual habits. Remember to do this only with the necessary people. Otherwise, your memorable essay will end up being excessively large and tedious.

Strong end

Take any legendary movie and watch its ending. It is always breathtaking, expressive and unforgettable. You should do the same thing leaving readers to think about before you finish your article. A grand finale will influence the audience and their emotional timbre, leaving your readers in the dark long after reading your essay.

Apart from that, it is also necessary to take a break and get closer to the room after a while. Try to read your essay aloud and identify the parts that don’t feel natural to you.

Finally, be sure to check the consistency of the book by juxtaposing an introduction, body and conclusion. For best results, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Does it open wide and attract attention?
  • Does the journal provide enough information about me?
  • Was I able to follow the story?
  • Have I repeated myself?
  • Was it exciting?
  • Does it end on a good note?


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Salt Lake City Park renamed in honor of a pioneer Filipino nurse https://optimalj.com/salt-lake-city-park-renamed-in-honor-of-a-pioneer-filipino-nurse/ Sun, 29 Aug 2021 04:33:59 +0000 https://optimalj.com/salt-lake-city-park-renamed-in-honor-of-a-pioneer-filipino-nurse/ PARKS AND LEISURE COURTESY SERVICE Signage for the new Connie Chun Aliamanu Neighborhood Park in Salt Lake was unveiled today. The new Connie Chun Aliamanu Neighborhood Park in Salt Lake was celebrated today with the unveiling of updated signage to commemorate a pioneering Filipino nurse, the City and County Department of Parks and Recreation said. […]]]>
  • PARKS AND LEISURE COURTESY SERVICE

    Signage for the new Connie Chun Aliamanu Neighborhood Park in Salt Lake was unveiled today.

The new Connie Chun Aliamanu Neighborhood Park in Salt Lake was celebrated today with the unveiling of updated signage to commemorate a pioneering Filipino nurse, the City and County Department of Parks and Recreation said. Honolulu.

Honolulu City Council adopted a resolution this year to rename what was previously known as Aliamanu Neighborhood Park to include Connie Chun – a nurse, lawyer, and Hawaiian State Representative who in the 1980s backed a bill to establish the Nursing Home Without Walls program to provide comprehensive home care to chronic patients. sick or disabled patients.

“There was a huge need for public health officials to start making decisions in our Hawaii State Legislature, and she was a pioneer in that,” City Councilor Radiant Cordero said, who featured the resolution, during the unveiling in a video provided by DPR. .

Chun, who immigrated from Mindanao, was the first Filipina and nurse elected to the Hawaii House of Representatives, and she served from 1980 to 1984. She was the first graduate nurse from the Philippines in the public health program of the Loma Linda University in California, and later, in 1978, graduated with a law degree from William S. Richardson Law School at the University of Hawaii.

Chun also wrote a personal essay describing his life in the “barrios” neighborhood in the Philippines. She died at age 92 in Honolulu.

Along with Cordero, Ryan Tam, who is Chun’s nephew and chairman of the Ala Moana-Kakaako neighborhood council, and DPR staff celebrated the name change in a small ceremony.


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School is not real life – our children should remember this https://optimalj.com/school-is-not-real-life-our-children-should-remember-this/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 20:19:39 +0000 https://optimalj.com/school-is-not-real-life-our-children-should-remember-this/ Scary Mom and Ariel Skelley / Getty Every morning, before I send my boys to their elementary school, I say the same things. I tell them I love them, remind them to turn in their files, and encourage them to be kind. Then I say something that I wish someone had told me when I […]]]>
Scary Mom and Ariel Skelley / Getty

Every morning, before I send my boys to their elementary school, I say the same things. I tell them I love them, remind them to turn in their files, and encourage them to be kind. Then I say something that I wish someone had told me when I was their age: “Do your best, but remember school is not real life!” As long as they are doing their best and being nice, there will be no consequences at home for the non-behavioral things that happen at school, and they know it. I did it on purpose.

I would have liked to understand when I was little that school is not real life.

Let me give you one of the millions of examples I could give you of how my anxiety disorder interfered with my childhood: When I was in fifth grade, I forgot to hand in a Bible assignment. (Yeah, the Bible. Southern Baptist Private School. That’s quite a thing.) Anyway, I forgot about it, and by the time I remember it, my teacher said it was too late. I couldn’t give it back, and had to take a zero. That would make my overall grade for the report card period an 84, which was a C (yes, really) in my school.

I had never had a C in my entire life. I was supposed to be the smart “good girl” who didn’t make mistakes like forgetting an assignment. At ten, I had already fully embarked on the role for which I felt most suited to play. As a chubby kid, the message I received from the entire planet outside my home was loud and clear: I couldn’t rely on my appearance to carry me out, so I had to be smart, kind and hardworking.

My parents had high expectations of me academically because I was always very successful, but they also praised me. It wasn’t their fault. I never wondered if they thought I was brilliant and good – and I lived for their approval.

The night before I knew the bulletins were going to come home, I lay in silence until I heard them fall asleep, then let myself fall apart.

I cried softly until the nerves took over, and I had to run to the bathroom to throw up. I entered school the next day with my knees shaking, spent the whole day nervous and sad, and when I got in my mom’s car after school with my report card in my hand, I fell Out of order. When she saw that I was so upset, she thought I was going to let her know that I had been mistreated or even abused.

When she realized that my hysterics were related to a note, she was so relieved that it didn’t hurt. I also didn’t really have a pass or any sort of insurance because she didn’t even know I needed them. She just told me to do better next time. And I did. I never had another C until 11e class.

My oldest son is my carbon copy.

JGI / Jamie Grill / Getty

He is intelligent and naturally kind. He’s also anxious and prone to putting himself the kind of pressure I used to put on myself when I was his age. When I see him start to be very upset with something related to school or his own personal performance, I am instantly transported to the early 90s when I started to suffer from what I now realize to be an anxiety disorder. permanent.

At the time, I didn’t know that all I had to do was talk to my parents and they would have helped me. I didn’t have the language to describe it even though I wanted to try. I didn’t know what an anxiety disorder looked like, and I certainly didn’t realize that it wasn’t normal to be so tied up all the time.

Sadly, I can’t go back and help little Katie figure out what she never understood back then. I can’t give her the wisdom to tell her parents how much she was in pain, I can’t give her back those sleepless nights, and I can’t even let her know that she really wouldn’t need this Bible class. anyway. I can’t undo the way anxiety stole so many childhood years that were meant to be carefree.

But I can help my kids not suffer the same fate, and that’s why I make sure they know school isn’t real life.

It’s not that I act like school isn’t important. If they are upset about something to do with school, I don’t dismiss their concerns by saying, “School is not real life. If it feels real to them, it is real. I don’t use my mantra as a weapon to minimize their experiences.

They also know that I expect them to behave, to follow instructions, to treat other students with kindness, and to do their best with every task. If I ever hear that one of them isn’t nice to anyone or completely refuses to try, I’ll be very, very disappointed, and they know it.

I’m just clarifying that once they give a mission the best possible effort that day, I’m not concerned with the outcome. If I see any of them constantly struggling with a concept, we’ll cross that bridge when we get to it. I am happy to give them the help they need to learn and succeed in school.

A failed mission will not follow them home.

I won’t be disappointed at the dinner table if they can’t map out a sentence correctly every time, or if geometry just isn’t their thing. I won’t accuse them of being unable to memorize the dates of the battles of the Revolutionary War, or of being a little shitty writing essays.

In the real world, not everyone is good at everything. My husband works in military finance and loves numbers. If I asked him to write this essay, he would look at a blank screen with absolutely zero inspiration, even though we are raising the same children with the same rules. Creative writing is not its jam.

If you were to ask me to balance an Air Force base’s budget or fill out travel papers for someone deploying across the world, I would probably cry. It’s not what I’m good at.

My kids will find the things they love, and once the government mandated portion of their schooling is over, they will pursue a lot of those things and do very little of the rest. I want them to know that right now, school is just their job, not their life. They are there to learn a little more about a lot of things in the hope that something will “stick” and they have ideas on what they would like to do later.

Above my front door I have a sign that says, “Take a deep breath. You are at the house now.

When my boys come home from school, this is the first message they see. It is also the one thing I hope I can give them as a wife and mother. Life outside these walls will always be full of stress, anxiety and frustration. Do the things that we have to do is never as pleasant as to do the things that we love to do.

But when they walk through our door, I still want them to feel right at home, this is where they can breathe. At home we see you, you are loved, and you don’t have to be good at everything. You just have to be your happiest and most genuine self, whatever it is. It’s the version of you that belongs here: leave your school worries at the door.


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